Thursday, March 21, 2019
Technical jargon can sometimes get confusing or overwhelming, which is why Canva has come up with a fantastic infographic that uses simple illustrations to explain the 20 most important design principles.
Our book of the week is none other than Don Norman's The Design of Everyday Things, considered the essential guide to human-centered design.
From flat to fading, from stripes to geometry, logo trends always make headlines. Every year, right on schedule, the articles come streaming in. What are this year’s trends? What’s coming up? What should we all be doing? Everyone’s listening, curious for an answer, and excited for another full year of designing. Whatever the case may be, the reality is that logo trends are always a hot topic. But why? What even are logo trends? And should you be following them?
Ready for a good listen? A great podcast can provide inspiration as well as a mental break while you work or relax. There’s no shortage of outstanding podcasts for designers and creatives, covering web design, creative life, and much more!
Graphic designers have to use a variable arsenal of skills every day. From kerning and letting, to matching colors and making vectors, designers have to be ready for anything. Keeping our skills sharp is key but sometimes it’s hard to take the time to practice. Luckily, the Internet is full of entertaining ways to hone your skills. We found five free-to-play online games to help designers practice and even learn something new.
This week's book of the week is the Superpowers of Visual Storytelling by Laura Stanton and David LaGesse
Every designer has encountered some major package design mistakes in their career, so we’ve covered some of the most common (and unfortunate) ones below. Avoiding these common blunders can save your business time, money, and embarrassment later.
In issue 153 of Graphis magazine(1971/72), Stanley Mason wrote a piece titled “How Paul Rand Presents Trade-Mark Designs to Clients”. It shared examples of the short-run booklets Rand used for showcasing his single-option design ideas, along with Rand’s thoughts on logos.
Here's how a simple mark ends up meaning something big as a great logo. Joe Posner, and Michael Bierut (designer of the Hillary Clinton logo) explain.
Whether or not you’re a designer, this exercise will help sharpen your product sense and improve your eye for design.
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